gambeson armor effectiveness

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ABOUT PRODUCT :- A gambeson (also known as aketon, padded jack, pourpoint, or arming doublet) is a padded defensive jacket, worn as armor separately, or combined with mail or plate armor. Gambesons were produced with a sewing technique called quilting. They were usually constructed of cotton, linen or wool;

In different times, this kind of armor called as a "fighting jacket". Such armor outfit was an integral part of the knight's kit. Gambeson was as an underwear of a breastplate or chain mail. As an independent armor Gambeson was made of thick materials …

Answer (1 of 3): Highly variable. A poorly made gambeson wasn't much more effective than a double layer of clothing. Better than a single layer, but that's about it. Better gambesons had tightly packed layers, greatly increasing their protection. Often the …

Cheaper armor like chain mail (which is the sort of thing a more common soldier might wear; knights were essentially 'special forces') isn't useful against bullets, though heavier plate armor can stop bullets pretty well. The problem is this type of armor is expensive and hard to move around in. Can a Gambeson stop a bullet?

They were never armor. Gambesons were and are shelter if done right. They are warm, in the cold and cool in the summer they keep you alive in the worse weather you can think of. NO one had changes of cloths, you had ONE gambeson and thats it for decades even a lifetime that was your own clothes so it had to be tough and work in all weather.

Cheaper armor like chain mail (which is the sort of thing a more common soldier might wear; knights were essentially 'special forces') isn't useful against bullets, though heavier plate armor can stop bullets pretty well. The problem is this type of armor is expensive and hard to move around in. Can a Gambeson stop a bullet?

Nice against the occasional bite, but worthless when 47 of them are piled on top of you. 2. level 1. AddSomeMemes. 2 years ago. Slow, and even though they can't bite you being trapped underneath all those zombies if you get caught in a big group, you'd eventually die. 3. …

The lightest and most effective armour of the time was the padded gambeson, which is surprisingly effective against slashes and cuts but is exposed by arrows, bolts and thrusts by solid shaped points (spears, the pointy bits of pole weapons and the very nasty rondel dagger (think 16" 3 or 4 sided steel spike)The arm chains are there to give ...

In fact, some knights even chose brigandine over plated armor! That's how good it is! Stacking them actually adds a couple of disadvantages: The restrictiveness of the armor. Brigandine is designed to be quite form-fitting for it to be effective, and it's hard to slap that on top of gambeson without causing some squeezing.

Often used as armor unto itself or as padded under armor, the gambeson (aka aketon or arming doublet) was a vital part of a medieval soldier or knight's equipment since the X century. Saint Georges Et Le Dragon ... but very conclusive …

This isn't without some precedent: in the late 13th century a gambeson paired with an aketon was considered roughly equal to metal armour. On the other hand, the effectiveness of the French jack could just be down to arrowheads more orientated towards penetrating plate armour and the thin padding underneath, at the expense of being able to ...

A gambeson (also aketon, padded jack, pourpoint, or arming doublet) is a padded defensive jacket, worn as armor separately, or combined with mail or plate armor.Gambesons were produced with a sewing technique called quilting.They were usually constructed of linen or wool; the stuffing varied, and could be for example scrap cloth or horse hair. During the 14th …

Answer: By itself? No. I mean at extreme ranges, maybe it would seem to be, but those would be ranges were the shot would be marginal at penetrating the skin anyway. The gambeson was always, even for melee weapons, a padded layer, or a trauma panel. Not unlike the modern concept of ICW armor, wh...

Answer: By itself? No. I mean at extreme ranges, maybe it would seem to be, but those would be ranges were the shot would be marginal at penetrating the skin anyway. The gambeson was always, even for melee weapons, a padded layer, or a trauma panel. Not unlike the modern concept of ICW armor, wh...